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Needed: Hate crime/clergy prosecution map

An interactive, online hate-crime map was created by National Public Radio. Very nice, and Dan at Bold Faith Type wants a list of prosecutions of clergy “for their speech in the pulpit” in those areas.

Perhaps in an interactive map, please?

He assumes our Christian Right friends are ready with a list, since they argued so strenuously that a federal hate crimes law would “lead to the silencing of clergy.”

Waiting . . .

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October 28, 2009 Posted by | Religion, WWW | , | Comments Off on Needed: Hate crime/clergy prosecution map

An outrage

Accounts of the incident provoke natural outrage and moral concern. Although we don’t know how well those accounts will withstand future examination:

A 15-year-old girl was gang-raped, beaten, and robbed by six to ten men ranging in age from 15 to their early 20s on Saturday in Richmond, Calif., after leaving her high school homecoming dance. More appallingly, police say, over the course of two hours, as many as two dozen people witnessed the crime, but didn’t interfere.

Some have already ascribed observer reactions to bystander effect. That may be correct, although the phenomenon is complex and not well-applied from a distance. We simply do not know, and the best-known incident of this kind is a caution against rush to judgment:

At 3:15 a.m. on March 13, 1964, Catherine Susan Genovese was raped and stabbed to death by a serial killer in a widely misreported incident which prompted research into diffusion of responsibility and the bystander effect.

The event itself, however, was not as originally reported. There may have been no bystanders who were in a position to help, and who failed to act. The defamatory moral judgment passed on people living in the area at the time were apparently wrongheaded.

In 2007, Rachel Manning, Mark Levine and Alan Collins published a study of it in American Psychologist:

This article argues that an iconic event in the history of helping research–the story of the 38 witnesses who remained inactive during the murder of Kitty Genovese–is not supported by the available evidence. Using archive material, the authors show that there is no evidence for the presence of 38 witnesses, or that witnesses observed the murder, or that witnesses remained inactive. Drawing a distinction between the robust bystander research tradition and the story of the 38 witnesses, the authors explore the consequences of the story for the discipline of psychology. They argue that the story itself plays a key role in psychology textbooks. They also suggest that the story marks a new way of conceptualizing the dangers of immersion in social groups. Finally, they suggest that the story itself has become a modern parable, the telling of which has served to limit the scope of inquiry into emergency helping.

There may be either more wrong in Richmond, Calif., or less, than we can responsibly infer from published accounts.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | Comments Off on An outrage

An atrocity in Calif.

Kitty Genovese image which appeared in NYTimes article.

Kitty Genovese

Accounts of the incident provoke natural outrage and moral concern. Although we don’t know how well those accounts will withstand future examination:

A 15-year-old girl was gang-raped, beaten, and robbed by six to ten men ranging in age from 15 to their early 20s on Saturday in Richmond, Calif., after leaving her high school homecoming dance. More appallingly, police say, over the course of two hours, as many as two dozen people witnessed the crime, but didn’t interfere.

Some have already ascribed observer reactions to bystander effect. They may be correct, although the phenomenon is complex and not well-applied from a distance. We simply do not know, and the best-known incident of this kind is a caution against rush to judgment:

At 3:15 a.m. on March 13, 1964, Catherine Susan Genovese was raped and stabbed to death by a serial killer in a widely misreported incident which prompted research into diffusion of responsibility and the bystander effect.

The event itself, however, was not as originally reported. There may have been no bystanders who were in a position to help, and who failed to act. The defamatory moral judgment passed on people living in the area at the time were apparently wrongheaded.

In 2007, Rachel Manning, Mark Levine and Alan Collins published a study of it in American Psychologist:

This article argues that an iconic event in the history of helping research–the story of the 38 witnesses who remained inactive during the murder of Kitty Genovese–is not supported by the available evidence. Using archive material, the authors show that there is no evidence for the presence of 38 witnesses, or that witnesses observed the murder, or that witnesses remained inactive. Drawing a distinction between the robust bystander research tradition and the story of the 38 witnesses, the authors explore the consequences of the story for the discipline of psychology. They argue that the story itself plays a key role in psychology textbooks. They also suggest that the story marks a new way of conceptualizing the dangers of immersion in social groups. Finally, they suggest that the story itself has become a modern parable, the telling of which has served to limit the scope of inquiry into emergency helping.

There may be either more wrong in Richmond, Calif., or less, than we can responsibly infer from published accounts.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Crime, Cultural | , , | 1 Comment

Defense/hate-crimes bill signed into law

President Obama killed some costly defense projects and took the landmark civil rights step of extending federal hate crimes coverage to homosexuals when he signed the defense bill passed last week.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Crime, Obama | , | Comments Off on Defense/hate-crimes bill signed into law

Congo/Women

This photograph by Lynsey Addario is from “Congo/Women: Portraits of War,” on view in the north gallery of the public lobby at the United Nations through Nov. 12.

It’s about rape, used as a weapon of war in the Congo.

The prevalence and intensity of sexual violence in the Congo is described as the worst in the world.

The passage below is from The Physical and Psychological Impact of Rape – one of several on the associated Web site:

Frequently observed psychological effects include intense feelings of worthlessness and shame, guilt and culpability, social isolation aggravated by family and community rejection, depression, paranoia, and apathy. Often victims are left by their husbands, separated from their children, and reluctant to engage in normal daily activities.

All in addition to horrific physical wounds. Read the entire piece (and others) here.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Politics, torture | , , , | 2 Comments

Look before you cross the Trick or Treat street

deathrate

Yes, protect the children against contracting H1N1 from Halloween treats (or giving it to someone else). Carefully, while remembering that the real horror of Halloween is pedestrian deaths.

Liz Szabo writes for USA Today:

Children are more than twice as likely to be killed by a car while walking on Halloween than any other night of the year, according to Safe Kids USA. More than 540 kids under age 14 are killed in pedestrian accidents each year. In an analysis of deaths from 2002 to 2006, the group found an average of 2.2 children are killed in pedestrian accidents from 4 to 10 p.m. on Halloween, compared with one child every other evening at the same time.

Halloween is the most dangerous day of the year for kids because they’re out in large numbers and wearing costumes which are not designed to make them visible to motorists.

In addition to pedestrian safety, get the H1N1 vaccine before making your traditional Trick or Treat trips, follow the other Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tips and use this teachable evening to train the children in how to be and remain flu-safe.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Churches | | 2 Comments

More than a quarter of a million U.S. youth in danger of commercial sex exploitation

Says the U.S. Department of Justice Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section. Hence the busts, focused on arresting traffickers and rescuing children.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Crime | , , | Comments Off on More than a quarter of a million U.S. youth in danger of commercial sex exploitation

Pay up, Bishop Williamson

A German court has ruled that Catholic Bishop Richard Williamson, a member of the an ultra-traditionalist Catholic splinter group Society of Saint Pius X (SSPX), has to pay a 12,000 Euros ($16,822) fine for incitement.

Calling into question Pope Benedict XVI’s decision to lift his excommunication and that of three other Lefebvrite bishops, Williamson denied in a televised interview that the Holocaust occurred. The interview was conducted near Regensburg [See the video] shortly before the excommunications were lifted.

He has two weeks to appeal and apparently will, even as the Vatican carries forward unification talks with SSPX.

For shame, sir.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Catholic, Pope Benedict XVI, Uncategorized | , | Comments Off on Pay up, Bishop Williamson

eBay says ‘no’ to the Roeder auction

Attempting to raise money for the defense of Scott Roeder, who is charged with first-degree murder in George Tiller’s death, supporters planned an eBay auction. Planned, and written about by the Kansas City Star. And eBay says “no:”

“Based on the details we know about the anticipated listings, we believe these would violate our policy regarding offensive material,” the company said in a statement issued to The Kansas City Star. “eBay will not permit the items in question to be posted to the eBay site, and they will be removed if they are posted.”

How offensive?

Mark Silk explains:

Among the items they planned to auction is a prison drawing by Roeder of David and Goliath depicting David holding the head of Goliath with the name “Tiller” inscribed on Goliath’s forehead. On the corpse are the words “child-murdering industry.”

Perhaps it was not a flatly stated point of the overall effort to both rationalize and glorify violence. But that drawing. And calls for Roeder to use a “necessity defense,” saying that Tiller’s killing on May 31 was an act of justifiable homicide.

Accusing eBay of violating someone’s First Amendment rights, and auction proponents are doing that, is a red herring.

H/T: Mark Silk

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Religion, WWW | , | Comments Off on eBay says ‘no’ to the Roeder auction

More fog about NAMB’s future

North American Mission Board

Stay in the dark, Southern Baptists.

Great Commission Resurgence Task Force (GCRTF) member Ted Traylor told the Florida Baptist Witness that he “did some serious thinking” about the prospect of simultaneously leading the North American Mission Board (NAMB) presidential search committee.

He of course accepted, thus raising again the keystone question:

Will the troubled NAMB be merged with the troubled International Mission Board?

Traylor acknowledged speculation the GCRTF may recommend merging IMB and NAMB or creating one new mission board to replace the current mission boards, but said, “I also know what is being discussed in the GCR meetings. However, I do not believe it is my place to discuss those things until we come to some solid conclusions.”

We already know SBC chief Johnny Hunt doesn’t want anyone to talk about the fate of the recently troubled and, a well-respected Southern Baptist leader says, misconceived agency. So GCRTF members go on filling the air with fog.

Addendum

Read the entire story and you will see Traylor either isn’t reading or has decided not to heed Wade Burleson’s warnings against attaching God’s name to our decisions.

October 28, 2009 Posted by | Religion, SBC | , , | Comments Off on More fog about NAMB’s future